PsyD Students Present Research at Scholar’s Day

Scholar's Day 2016
PsyD students Steven Razo and Peter Narbonne at Scholar’s Day

Antioch University Santa Barbara students in the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) program create posters and presented their research on Friday, June 10 to the campus community at the program’s annual Scholar’s Day.

Scholar’s Day is a forum for advanced doctoral students to present posters depicting the research they are proposing and conducting. The campus is invited to browse all of them and discuss the topics with the students. The research conducted by the students often form the basis of their dissertations.

“It fills me with pride to see our students presenting their research at Scholars’ Day,” said Brett Kia-Keating, EdD, Teaching Faculty in the PsyD program. “Witnessing what they have done and hearing their mastery of the research not only affirms how much they have learned, but also their commitment to social justice.”

** See more photos of Scholar’s Day 2016 on the AUSB Facebook page **

The students who presented and their topics are:

Peter Achenbach: Do Low Income Families Experience More Anxiety?

Rocio Andrade: Understanding the Non-Offending Parents of Sexually Abused Children

Scholar's Day 2016
PsyD student Samuel Ballou discusses his research at Scholar’s Day 2016.

Nicole Auckerman: Pet Ownership and Life Satisfaction

Samuel Ballou: Factor Structure of the Socrates A & D Questionnaire Among Participants in a Community Mental Health Setting

Merushka Bisetty: Culturally-Conscious Psychosocial Efforts for Families Affected by Childhood Cancer

Kyle DiFulvio: Equine Facilitated Therapies

Talon Edson: The Influence of Eyewitness Memory Factors on Attorney Plea Bargaining Decisions

Christina Espindola: Relationships with Standardized Testing, Non-Native English Speakers and Students with Disabilities

Suzanne L. Frost: Living on the Edge: The Mental Health Effects of Nature on Low-Income Single Mothers

Jake Gladstone: Martial Arts and Self-Care: An Effective Practice to Reduce Burnout?

Jack Hills: The Influence of Age on Rates of Drug Abuse or Dependence Among Non-Affective Psychotic People

Scholar's Day 2016
PsyD student Ali Madrid tells a colleague about her research at the 2016 Scholar’s Day.

Douglas Johnson: Group Therapy and Alcoholism

Maz Karandish: Mindfulness and Well-Being

Itay Kohane: Satisfaction in Relationship Balance Among Orthodox Jewish and Gender

Ali Madrid: Global Index Severity Responses Affected by Childhood Neglect

Peter Louis Narbonne: Cortisol as a Biomarker for Anxiety and Depression

Francisco Ramirez: Quantitative Analysis of Susceptibility Risk Factors Associated with PTSD

Steven Razo: Collegial Support and Burnout: Special Considerations for the Marriage and Family Therapist

Ray Sullivan: Exploring the Relationship Between Parental Attachment and Anxiety in Children

Reed A. Vierra: Effect of Physical Health at Age 16 on Later Mental Health

Patricia Zadeh: The Experiences of Women Married to Partners with Narcissistic Traits

AUSB’s Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) prepares students for multiple roles in the field of psychology while promoting self reflection, clinical and research skills, and the development of theoretical knowledge required for a successful career. To learn more, visit antiochsb.edu/psyd.

Posted on June 10, 2016

PsyD Program Places 100% of Year 4 Students in Internships

Congratulations to the 15 students in the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) who have secured internships. Every student seeking an internship was successful in securing one. These students have completed their coursework on campus and are moving to the next step, the pre-doctoral internship. Here are four examples of what the PsyD students will be doing at their sites:

Michelle Greenspoon BarrettMichelle Greenspoon Barrett will head to the other side of the country to work in the Adult Corrections Division of the North Carolina Department of Public Safety in Raleigh.

During her time there, Michelle will have the opportunity to work in several roles, including outpatient services, inpatient mental health services, and specialized sex offender treatment. She will be working with male and female inmates with mental illnesses, substance use disorders, on Death Row, and with the general inmate population. “My family and I are looking forward to moving to Raleigh for this new adventure,” Michelle said.

Divina JohnstonDivina Johnston will begin her internship at the University of Nevada in Reno on August 1. She will be working with college students doing individual and group therapy and conducting psychological assessments. Divina said she is most excited about the opportunity to train in a program that places high importance on multicultural diversity while also giving her the experiences that she desires.

“While I’m looking forward to this next exciting chapter in my educational journey, I will miss Antioch and my cohort,” she said. “I hope that we will continue to stay in touch with each other.”

Brandon MaynardBrandon Maynard will travel to Casper, Wyoming, to work at the Rocky Mountain Psychology Internship Consortium conducting individual therapy, group therapy, psychological evaluations and assessments, and didactic trainings throughout Wyoming. He will be working with all types of patients but will have a focus on children and families, mostly of low socio-economic status. Brandon is looking forward to relocating to the frontier state of Wyoming and working with an extremely different population than he has previously.

“I graduated with my MA in Clinical Psychology in 2013, and am honored and excited to graduate with my PsyD from AUSB as well,” he said. “I’ll continue to carry on the precepts of social justice and excellence in standard of care for the duration of my career, with Antioch as the launching point.”

Lissa PrattLissa Pratt will be working for the Center for Autism and Related Disorders. Her internship will include various types of assessment and testing, including cognitive, language, developmental, personality, adaptive, neuropsychological, learning disorder, gifted testing, and psychodiagnostic while also working with social skills groups.

Lissa will be working mostly with children and adolescents and some adults, many with autism or other developmental disabilities. “The program directors have so much knowledge and experience and seem highly supportive,” Lissa said about her internship site.

Sofia MurilloSofia Murillo will be working at The Northern California Corrections and Rehabilitation Consortium’s (NCDCRC) internship program at the California Men’s Colony. NCDCR offers a broad range of clinical experiences with a diverse patient population to pre-doctoral students seeking well-rounded training in the field of psychology.

As an intern, Sofia will have the opportunity to work with a diverse population of inmate-patients housed in one of the California prisons, which offers a unique opportunity for interns embarking on the journey of becoming culturally competent clinicians. Also within the frame-work of the scientifically-informed practitioner model, the training programs emphasize the incorporation of psychological science into the practice and delivery of culturally competent services.

Other AUSB PsyD student internship sites are:

  • BHC Alhambra Hospital’s Adult PHP Program in Santa Barbara 
  • Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
  • Elderly Behavioral Wellness Services in Los Angeles 
  • Pasadena City College’s Counseling Center (2 students)
  • San Luis Obispo Community Counseling Center
  • Southern California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Consortium
  • Sovereign Health of San Clemente
  • The Wright Institute’s Los Angeles Counseling Center (2 students)

AUSB’s Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) prepares students for multiple roles in the field of psychology while promoting self reflection, clinical and research skills, and the development of theoretical knowledge required for a successful career. To learn more, visit antiochsb.edu/psyd.

Posted on June 1, 2016

Märta Waldrop Bergman, Lena Moran, Megan Kain Named Student Speakers at Commencement

2015 Commencement
Graduates celebrate at the 2015 Commencement ceremony.

Märta Waldrop Bergman from the Bachelor of Arts program, Lena Moran from the MA in Education program, and Megan Kain from the PsyD in Clinical Psychology program will be the three student speakers at the 2016 Commencement at the Fess Parker Resort on Monday, June 20.

Students graduating from all programs were eligible to submit speeches for review. A panel of faculty from all programs reviewed all without knowing the identity of the author for fairness. Speeches and were rated on writing quality, interest to a general audience, evidence of critical thinking, and consistency with the following theme:

Antioch University’s mission is to provide “… education to empower students with the knowledge and skills to lead meaningful lives and to advance social, economic, and environmental justice.” How has this mission been manifested in your experience at Antioch University Santa Barbara?

In addition to these three students, Dalia Ruiz, a 2015 PsyD graduate, will speak and receive the 2016 Distinguished Graduate Award, and Gina Bell, an adjunct in the BA program, will receive the 2016 Excellence in Teaching Award.

In 2015, the student speakers were Linda Hoover from the PsyD program and BA graduate Miranda Rich.

Posted on May 26, 2016

PsyD Students to Present Dissertations in May and June

Several students in the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) at Antioch University Santa Barbara are presenting their dissertations in the upcoming weeks. All members of the AUSB community are invited to these presentations.

Marjorie McCarthy, MA, doctoral candidate

Marjorie McCarthyFriday, May 20 at 12:00 p.m. in Room 343

An Exploration of Moral Injury as Experienced by Combat Veterans

Dissertation Chair: Ron Pilato, PsyD
Second Faculty: Sharleen O’Brien, PsyD
External Expert: William Nash, MD

Crystal Gonsalves, MA, doctoral candidate

Crystal GonsalvesFriday, June 3 at 12:00 p.m. in Community Hall

The Remembered Experience of Adoption: Factors Supporting Healthy Adjustment

Dissertation Chair: Steve Kadin, PhD
Second Faculty: Bella DePaulo, PhD
External Expert: Violet Oaklander, PhD

Cameron Zielder, MA, doctoral candidate

Cameron ZiedlerThursday, June 9 at 12:00 p.m. in Community Hall

Psychoneuroimmunology: New Modality for Psychoeducation: Enhancing Treatment Efficacy and Reducing Sexual Offender Recidivism In Court-Mandated Treatment

Dissertation Chair: Brett Kia-Keating, EdD
Second Faculty: Christopher Howard, PsyD
External Expert: Joseph Lockhart, PhD, ABPP

Blake Brisbois, MA, doctoral candidate

Blake BrisboisThursday, June 16 at 12:00 p.m. in Community Hall

The Lived Experience of Facilitating the Violet Oaklander Model of Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents

Dissertation Chair: Ron Pilato, PsyD
Second Faculty: Lee Weiser, PhD
External Expert: Violet Oaklander, PhD

Leryn Messori, MA, doctoral candidate

Leryn MessoriThursday, June 16 at 2:00 p.m. in Community Hall

Frequencies Between Serial Killer Typology and Theorized Etiological Factors

Dissertation Chair: Ron Pilato, PsyD
Second Faculty: Brett Kia-Keating, EdD
External Expert: Maxann Schwartz, PhD

Kayleigh Hay, MA, doctoral candidate

Kayleigh HayFriday, June 17 at 12:00 p.m. in Community Hall

Factors Influencing Father Involvement with Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Dissertation Chair: Salvador Treviño, PhD
Second Faculty: Denise Mock, PhD
External Expert: Sarah De Los Santos, PsyD

Megan Marie Kain, MA, doctoral candidate

Megan Marie KainFriday, June 17 at 2:00 p.m. in Community Hall

Bind, Tether and Transcend: Achieving Integration through Extra-therapeutic Dance

Dissertation Chair: Sharleen O’Brien, PsyD
Second Faculty: Chris Howard, PsyD
External Expert: Paula Thomson, PsyD

Posted on May 13, 2016

PsyD’s Salvador Treviño Presents at Cuesta College Symposium

Salvadore TrevinoDr. Salvador Treviño, core faculty in the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) at Antioch University Santa Barbara, was the keynote speaker at the Cuesta College DREAMer Symposium held on Saturday, May 7, in San Luis Obispo. The symposium was well attended by mental health professionals, college and high school students, parents, faculty from various schools and colleges, and members of the Latino community from as far away as Bakersfield.

Dr. Trevino’s plenary speech focused on the trauma of immigration and Latino mental health within the current socio-political climate of the upcoming 2016 United States presidential elections. Dr. Treviño, who represents AUSB at professional venues throughout the United States, is a popular and frequently invited speaker on matters related to Latino mental health and social justice. Dr. Treviño’s professional presentations are examples of AUSB’s core values of social justice and community engagement at work.

Dr. Treviño has taught graduate level professional psychology for close to 15 years and lectures extensively on the theory and practice of child and adolescent psychology, character disorders, clinical skills development, Latino mental health, and psychoanalytic therapy.

AUSB’s Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology prepares students for multiple roles in the field of psychology while promoting self reflection, clinical and research skills, and the development of theoretical knowledge required for a successful career. For more information, visit www.antiochsb.edu/psyd.

Posted on May 11, 2016

 

Dr. Dalia Ruiz Receives the 2016 Distinguished Graduate Award

Dalia RuizDr. Dalia Ruiz has been awarded Antioch University Santa Barbara’s Distinguished Graduate Award for 2016.

Dr. Ruiz graduated from the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) at AUSB in 2015. Since then, Dr. Ruiz has been finishing her post-doctoral internship, worked in the Latino Outreach Program of San Luis Obispo County, and provides education on mental health issues to Latinos in her hometown of Santa Maria. She recently has secured a contract starting in the fall with a local high school district to implement her treatment and program throughout the schools.

“Attending Antioch laid the foundation for lifelong learning, nurtured my passion for research and education, and developed my confidence as an effective speaker,” Dr. Ruiz said. “The skills I learned at Antioch have served to help me speak with power, passion and purpose.”

As this year’s honoree, Dr. Ruiz will be making remarks at a reception for AUSB scholarship and grant recipients on Monday, May 9 as well as a speech at the 2016 Commencement on Monday, June 20.

As for what she refers to as “spare time,” Dr. Ruiz is also developing an impressive reputation as a scholar. Since her graduation in 2015, she has presented papers at three different conferences in Thailand, Egypt, and Peru. Her research includes the teen birth crisis in Guatemala; torture, trauma, and mental health treatment trends; and trauma treatment among Latino children. Dr. Ruiz has also developed a treatment manual aimed at culturally competent practice with Latino children and their caregivers, which is presented in both English and Spanish and is currently under review for publication.

Her development as a Practitioner and Scholar is no doubt the reason she received nomination by the PsyD faculty. In honoring Dr. Ruiz, AUSB also honors her faculty for their excellence as practitioners and scholars, and as the educators who have guided and mentored her.

“As AUSB’s president, I had the pleasure of calling Dr. Ruiz to tell her that she was our 2016 recipient of the Distinguished Graduate Award,” said Dr. Nancy Leffert. “She told me how surprised she was because she is ‘just starting out.’ Starting out she might be, but I expect we will be hearing a lot about her in the future.”

Posted on May 4, 2016

Daniel Schwartz Joins PsyD Program as Clinical Faculty

Dr. Daniel SchwartzDaniel Schwartz has joined the PsyD in Clinical Psychology program at Antioch University Santa Barbara as Clinical Faculty and Director of Clinical Training.

Dr. Schwartz received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1991. He earned a BA in History from the University of California, Berkeley and spent a year studying Social and Political Sciences at the University of Cambridge. In 2003, Dr. Schwartz completed psychoanalytic training at the Florida Psychoanalytic Institute, a member institute of the American Psychoanalytic Association.

“We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Dan Schwartz to our PsyD department,” said Ron Pilato, PsyD, Chair of the PsyD program. “He brings a wealth of experience, knowledge, and resources from his background in attachment theory and research at University of Michigan, UCSF, and Stanford. His professional training in psychoanalysis informs his specialized approach working with children and adults in private practice.  His expertise in psychodiagnostic assessment adds breadth and depth to our faculty team.”

Dr. Schwartz was a Fellow in the University of Michigan’s Interdisciplinary Program on Child Abuse and Neglect, and completed a Traineeship at the Infant-Parent Program at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), working with low-income families and their infants. He also completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Child and Adolescent Division of the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford University’s Medical School.

Both his doctoral research and clinical training were focused in the area of attachment theory. After completing his undergraduate degree, he worked for two years in Professor Mary Main’s lab, studying the attachment relationships of infants and their parents, and looking across the lifespan using the data set of University of California, Berkeley Institute for Human Development.

For over 15 years, Dr. Schwartz taught and supervised residents in the Department of Psychiatry at the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami, ending up as a Voluntary Associate Professor of Psychiatry. He also taught for several years in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Miami Medical School, as well as teaching graduate students in the Departments of Counseling and Clinical Psychology at the University of Miami. In addition, he taught courses to analytic candidates at the Florida Psychoanalytic Institute. For seven years, as a Full-time Teaching Analyst, he directed the Institute’s two-year certificate program in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy.

For over 20 years, Dan maintained a full-time private practice working with adults, couples, adolescents, and children in psychotherapy. Since 1999, he has worked intensively with individuals in analysis, a specialized treatment modality. Additionally, Dan conducted psychological testing with adults and children, focusing on projective personality assessment. His practice in South Florida enabled him to work with underserved populations – adults and children struggling with acculturation and diversity concerns.

Antioch University Santa Barbara’s Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) prepares students for multiple roles in the field of psychology while promoting self reflection, clinical and research skills, and the development of theoretical knowledge required for a successful career. For more information on the PsyD program, please visit antiochsb.edu/psyd.

Posted on February 10, 2016

PsyD Program Names 2015-16 Student Award Recipients

The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) at Antioch University Santa Barbara has announced its student award recipients for the 2015-16 academic year.

PsyD award winners 2015-16
From left: Kayleigh Hay, Suzanne Frost, Samuel Ballou, Michelle Greenspoon Barrett, Francisco Ramirez

Award for Excellence in Professionalism

Kayleigh Hay: Kayleigh is currently in her pre-doctoral CAPIC Internship at the Lifeskills Treatment Program in the Los Angeles area. Kayleigh has excelled in learning clinical supervision and management.

Suzanne Frost: Suzanne is a third year PsyD student, and her first practicum was at the Hillmont House, where she was also recognized for her outstanding contribution and professionalism as a doctoral student. Suzanne worked with the severely mentally ill in both group and individual therapy. This year she is providing therapy for students and their families at a local elementary school.

Samuel Ballou: Samuel is a third year PsyD student, and his practicum site is with A New Start for Moms in Ventura County Behavioral Health. He works with single-parent women and also with the homeless. He gained experience with quantitative research at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Program. And he speaks five languages!

Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarship

Michelle Greenspoon Barrett: Michelle has completed and presented her dissertation on “The Relationship Between Empathy and Humor Styles and Secondary Traumatic Stress in the Public Mental Health Workplace,” passed her professional competency evaluation, and is on track to be placed in her pre-doctoral internship. Michelle has excelled in research and is a published author.

Award for Excellence in Social Justice

Francisco Ramirez: Cisco’s practicum site is the Santa Barbara Unified School District, and he works with children in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment plans. He developed a non-profit organization with a colleague that provides mental health assistance to first responders. Cisco has been a police officer and also served five tours in Afghanistan and Iraq.

AUSB’s Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology prepares students for multiple roles in the field of psychology while promoting self reflection, clinical and research skills, and the development of theoretical knowledge required for a successful career. To learn more, visit www.antiochsb.edu/psyd.

Posted December 22, 2015

PsyD Program’s Dr. Salvador Treviño Speaks at Lyceum Conference

Salvador Trevino and Betty Purify
Salvador Trevino and Betty Purify

Dr. Salvador Treviño, Core Faculty and Director of Practicum in the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) program at Antioch University Santa Barbara, was the keynote speaker at The Lyceum: Mental Health Awards and Education Luncheon presented by the Community Counseling Center on Friday, October 9 in Pismo Beach.

Dr. Treviño’s keynote speech focused on “Ancestral Knowledge in Dreams,” and he also led a bonus Continuing Education Workshop on “Latino Immigration, Cultural Trauma, and Cultural Complex.”

“Dreams not only have a personal domain but a transpersonal realm that moves away from the private world of the dreamer and into the larger encompassing field of culture and history,” Dr. Treviño said. “Knowledge of these realms is constructed by talking, listening, and reflecting on dream images that have captured the social, cultural, and historical experiences of a community of people.”

The event also included the presentation of a Community Counseling Center scholarship to Betty Purify, a student in the AUSB PsyD program.

AUSB’s PsyD program prepares students for multiple roles in the field of psychology while promoting self reflection, clinical and research skills, and the development of theoretical knowledge required for a successful career. Learn more at www.antiochsb.edu/psyd.

Community Counseling Center is a non-profit mental provider staffed by qualified, state-licensed volunteer therapists or graduate level, supervised interns that has been serving San Luis Obispo County since 1968. The primary purpose is to assist individuals and families to develop the ability to find solutions, makes choices, learn healthy coping skills, and initiate changes when life becomes difficult during times of transition, depression, anxiety, trauma, and uncertainty.

The event was sponsored by Compass Health, Inc. and the Ventana Grill, and all proceeds benefit Community Counseling Center training and education programs.

Posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2015

PsyD Program Creates Partnership with Santa Barbara Unified School District

Salvadore Trevino
Dr. Salvador Treviño

The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) at Antioch University Santa Barbara has partnered with the Santa Barbara Unified School District to provide in-school counseling services for schoolchildren and their families.

The partnership was formed between Dr. Salvador Treviño, Core Faculty and Director of Practicum for AUSB’s PsyD program, and Raul Ramirez, EdD, Assistant Superintendent at SBUSD.

Beginning in the current Fall Quarter, five PsyD students are taking part. They are: Rocio Andrade, Suzanne Frost, Mazy KarandishFrancisco Ramirez, and Ray Sullivan.

AUSB’s students will be working at Roosevelt, Washington, Monroe, and McKinley elementary schools in SBUSD. The school district and AUSB also have partnered with Family Service Agency of Santa Barbara County and the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse.

AUSB’s PsyD program prepares students for multiple roles in the field of psychology while promoting self reflection, clinical and research skills, and the development of theoretical knowledge required for a successful career. Learn more about the PsyD program at antiochsb.edu/psyd.

Posted October 13, 2015

PsyD Faculty Don Fineberg Sings Praises of ‘Cold Mountain’ at Santa Fe Opera

Don FinebergDr. Don Fineberg, an adjunct faculty in the PsyD in Clinical Psychology program at Antioch University Santa Barbara, recently led a continuing education workshop in conjunction with the Santa Fe Opera in New Mexico.

Dr. Fineberg’s workshop was on August 1 and was entitled “From the Novel through the Opera: Narrative Continuity and Ethical Dilemmas in Jennifer Higdon’s Cold Mountain,” was part of Santa Fe’s Opera and Psychology series, which he has been involved in for almost 20 years.

Dr. Fineberg also conducted a conversation with the source novel’s author, Charles Frazier. The news program PBS News Hour was on hand to film a behind-the-scenes segment on the production, although Dr. Fineberg does not appear in the finished piece.

Dr. Fineberg wrote a piece examining the psychological aspects of Cold Mountain, and it is reprinted below.

The Psychology of Cold Mountain’s Narrative: From Novel to Libretto, by Don Fineberg, MD

Lessons learned from teaching for 20 years (mostly psychology, oft times English) converged in the year’s Opera and Psychology seminar. The seminar focused on Charles Frazer’s best-selling novel, Cold Mountain, as interpreted in the world-premier opera of the same name and capped off a whirlwind week with the author, including a discussion with students at the opera and an hour-long “conversation” at Collected Works bookstore. This presentation before a SRO crowd also included Gene Sheer, who converted the novel into the brilliant libretto. A PBS News Hour crew videotaped the event. The Opera and Psychology seminar investigated the powerful narrative at the core of both the novel and the opera.

When asked about the story of your life, what crosses your mind? Most people reflect on biographical highlights: when you were born, where you grew up, what school you attended, who you married, or how you make a living. That’s one kind of story. Yet, each one of us lives a second, even more important story – the “narrative” of our life.

Narrative informs our every thought, feeling and action. It remembers our past and anticipates our future. Consider this: if Hollywood made a movie of your life, starring YOU, the director would proclaim you the greatest acting talent ever to appear on screen. In every scene, the way you talk, act, express emotion is a perfect you! Put in an unexpected situation, you respond completely as you. Surely, you would be a favorite for the academy award. How do you do it? How does anyone do it? Simply put, our brains reinforce our personal narratives 24/7. It is our personality. It is how we live our lives.

The opera, Cold Mountain, sheds light on this process. The music, through-sung text (without spoken dialogue), acting and direction translated the lush, descriptive novel into a powerful evening’s performance. It narrated the same story: a tale with archetypal power, about a Confederate soldier’s longing for and travels towards home after he deserts in the closing months of the Civil War. The story detailed his trek, as well as the challenges experienced by Ada, his love at home awaiting his return. Reminiscent of Homer’s Odyssey, but not exactly parallel in content, this core human longing vibrates in each of us as we chart the course of our life, emancipating from mother, parents, family and community and carve a life uniquely ours.

Unlike the real world, opera must make clear the motives and feelings of the characters that inform their actions. Opera has the unique capacity to express all of these for characters as individuals, in duets, trios, quartets, quintets and of course moving chorus pieces. Sometimes, the music itself reveals the character’s inner life. Sometimes, the music weaves together the thoughts sung aloud simultaneously by several characters. In Cold Mountain, for example, one dramatic passage uses the symbol of “fences” – literal and psychological. The barriers we construct as well as those erected around us. The “fences” clearly represent something different to each character, even when they sing the exact same text. As with every great work of art, we find that the opera reflects, informs and sometimes inspires our quest to fulfill our personal longings for love and achievement.

Psychology brings a perceptive lens to opera narrative. With a variety of psychological approaches, we can deepen our appreciation of the narrative that unfolds before our eyes. WP Inman, the protagonist, has suffered terribly with physical and psychological wounds. How do the symptoms of his post-traumatic stress inform his actions, his character and ultimately his fate? Ada, his love, has chosen to survive the hardship of subsistence farming rather than return to the genteel life of the city where she was educated and raised. Through the opera’s story, we can better understand the motivations that lead to these decisions. As psychotherapists we ask, how do people’s experiences determine their life choices? What shapes their narratives into adaptive and functional lives? Or, what parts of their own stories undermine their striving for health and personal growth? The Opera and Psychology seminar had the advantage of asking these questions of fictional characters without conflicts of confidentiality.

Cold Mountain’s narrative invites us to explore relevant personal and social issues: Security – too much is confinement and too little is fearful chaos; Crisis – step up as a hero or shrink back as a coward; Setbacks – respond with resiliency or get mired in misfortune. Do we live in a world that makes sense or remains mysterious as we tell ourselves the story of our lives? As psychotherapists, we help others through these dilemmas. We seek ethical ways to guide people on these journeys. However, as this compelling opera reminds us, we all traverse the uncertain challenges of life. And, we all can embrace a narrative that meets these challenges.

PsyD Faculty Lisa Firestone Offers Seminar on Suicide and Therapy

Lisa FirestoneLisa Firestone, PhD, an adjunct faculty with Antioch University Santa Barbara’s PsyD in Clinical Psychology program, will lead a free seminar entitled “Suicide: What Therapists Need to Know” at Westmont College on Saturday, September 5 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

In this half-day workshop, Dr. Firestone will provide an in-depth understanding of the dynamics in suicide and of the legal, ethical, and case management issues when dealing with suicidal clients. She will outline the most up-to-date and effective treatment methods and provide training that can help save a life.

The workshop will:

  • Provide the latest findings on warning signs and risk factors for suicide.
  • Offer a conceptual model and a developmental perspective on the dynamics underlying suicide.
  • Explore the internal struggle the ambivalence of suicide through expert interviews and insight provided by three survivors of very lethal suicide attempts.
  • Address both objective assessment and the formation of clinical judgment.
  • Inform participants about recent research on empirically validated treatment approaches.
  • Provide participants with state of the art crisis management strategies and opportunities to practice them.

In addition to teaching at AUSB, Dr. Firestone has been a practicing clinical psychologist in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles for the last 20 years and works as the Director of Research and Education at The Glendon Association.

As a community service for National Suicide Prevention Month, there is no fee for this workshop. Attendees may earn four Continuing Education (CE) Units with a $25 fee. For more information and to register, visit glendon.org.

CE’s for this workshop are being provided by AUSB, who are approved by the California Psychological Association (CPA) to provide continuing professional education for psychologists. The California Board of Behavioral Sciences now recognizes CPA continuing education credit for license renewal for LCSWs and MFTs. AUSB maintains responsibility for this program and its contents.

Almost 150 AUSB Students Celebrate Commencement

2015 Antioch University Santa Barbara CommencementAlmost 150 Antioch University Santa Barbara (AUSB) students walked across the stage to collect their hard-earned diplomas at the Fess Parker Doubletree Resort on Friday, June 19, and transitioned from student to alumni.

At this year’s commencement, 147 students received degrees from AUSB’s academic programs. Of those, 77 received their Bachelor of Arts degrees; 13 completed the Graduate Education and Credentialing program; 42 finished the Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology program; 5 received their Master’s in Psychology degrees; and 10 completed the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) program.

Dr. Nancy Leffert, AUSB President, and Victoria Riskin, chair of the AUSB Board of Trustees, gave welcoming remarks, and Lynn Houston, who received her BA from AUSB in 2011 and was honored with this year’s Distinguished Graduate Award, spoke on behalf of the alumni.

2015 Antioch University Santa Barbara Commencement“It is my honor this year, as it is every year, to usher a new class of Antioch graduates into the world to continue the good work they have already begun on furthering their careers and professional lives,” Leffert said.

Linda Hoover, who graduated from the PsyD program, and Miranda Rich, a Bachelor of Arts graduate with concentrations in Communication & Media and Marketing, were named as the commencement student speakers.

“Being selected as a commencement speaker is the crowning jewel in my academic journey,” Hoover said. “I am honored by the privilege to represent the PsyD program and graduates this year.”

“My Antioch experience taught me that the goal of my education was not to leave knowing the threats that exist today but is to leave having the passion to fight them,” Rich said.

Susan Lang, MA, an affiliate faculty member at AUSB, received the 5th Annual Award for Excellence in Teaching at the ceremony.

Lang has taught at AUSB for over 15 years in both the Graduate Education and Bachelor of Arts programs and routinely receives stellar student evaluations. Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost Dr. Barbara Lipinski wrote that Susan’s “dedication to student learning and success in the areas of child development, psychology, and education is commendable. She brings innovative learning techniques that make the material in challenging courses accessible and comprehensible.”

View over 180 photos from the 2015 Commencement ceremony on the AUSB Facebook page.

 

Linda Hoover, Miranda Rich Named Commencement Speakers

2014 Antioch University Santa Barbara commencement
AUSB Commencement in 2014.

Linda Hoover, a student in the PsyD in Clinical Psychology program, and Miranda Rich, who will be graduating with a Bachelor of Arts with concentrations in Communication & Media and Marketing, have been named as the Antioch University Santa Barbara 2015 Commencement speakers.

This year’s commencement will take place on Friday, June 19, from 2:00-4:00pm at the Fess Parker Doubletree Resort at 633 East Cabrillo Blvd. in Santa Barbara. For more information on the ceremony, please visit antiochsb.edu/commencement.

“Being selected as a commencement speaker is the crowning jewel in my academic journey,” Linda said. “I am honored by the privilege to represent the PsyD program and graduates this year.”

Graduates-to-be from all programs submitted speeches to a panel comprised of faculty from all programs. The committee reviewed each without knowing the authors’ identities on writing quality, interest to a general audience, evidence of critical thinking, and consistency with the following theme:

Linda Hoover
Linda Hoover

Antioch University’s mission is to provide “…education to empower students with the knowledge and skills to lead meaningful lives and to advance social, economic, and environmental justice.” How has this mission been manifested in your experience at Antioch University Santa Barbara?

“My Antioch experience taught me that the goal of my education was not to leave knowing the threats that exist today, but is to leave having the passion to fight them,” Miranda said.

“Antioch exposed me to a world of new ideas, diverse cultures, and endless possibilities,” Linda added. “I was given the opportunity to see the world through my neighbor’s eyes, and discover something about others as well as myself in the process.”

Congratulations to all upcoming 2015 Antioch University Santa Barbara graduates!

Ron Pilato Joins Santa Barbara County Psychological Association Board

Ron PilatoDr. Ron Pilato, Chair and Core Faculty of Antioch University Santa Barbara’s Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD), has joined the Santa Barbara County Psychological Association Board of Directors.

Dr. Pilato will Chair the Continuing Education Committee of the Board with the responsibility for developing continuing education events that meet California Board of Psychology and American Psychological Association criteria for Continuing Education.

“I am happy to accept this invitation to serve the SBCPA Board of Directors in this way,” he said. “I see many potential opportunities for Antioch and the Association to collaborate on providing pragmatic, cutting edge continuing education programs in the near future.”

The Antioch University Santa Barbara Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology offers students a doctoral level practitioner-scholar training in clinical psychology, preparing them for multiple roles in the field. Learn more about the program at antiochsb.edu/psyd.

Antioch PsyD Students Placed in Prestigious Internships

James Chavers
James Chavers

Four students from the Antioch University Santa Barbara Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) program have been placed in prestigious internships at Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) sites.

James Chavers placed at Case Western/University Counseling Services in Cleveland, Ohio. “I believe that Antioch is beginning to develop a reputation in the industry as a school that is preparing students to be solid clinicians with a social justice emphasis,” James said. “I believe that this PsyD program is helping me on my journey to be the clinician and healer I aspire to be.”

Crystal Gonsalves
Crystal Gonsalves

Crystal Gonsalves will be working at the University of Washington-Tacoma. “The staff at Antioch University and my fellow cohort members have helped me grow both on a professional and personal level more so than I could have ever expected,” Crystal said. “I continue to be amazed at the level of warmth and knowledge expressed by my professors and their genuine care and concern for my continued growth. I have found it difficult to put into words how much this experience has meant to me and how thankful I am to everyone including my family, my wonderful cohort members and the professors.”

Yoseline Lopez-Marroquin
Yoseline Lopez-Marroquin

Yoseline Lopez-Marroquin will be heading to Children’s Institute, Inc. in Los Angeles, which is an American Psychological Association accredited site. Yoseline said, “I’ve been an Antioch student for over five years, and it has been a key factor in my life changes and developmental growth. Others are drawn to us, and I like being part of an academic family that is quite unique.”

Cameron Zeidler
Cameron Zeidler

Cameron Ziedler also placed at an APA-accredited site at Coalinga State Hospital with the California Psych Intern Consortium in Fresno. “Antioch University Santa Barbara prepared me as a practitioner and scholar in a rigorous environment set for achieving academic excellence,” Cameron said. “Their scholarly model, designed with a very personal student-centered approach, provided state-of-the-art fieldwork experience necessary for championing social justice advocacy and advancing therapeutic jurisprudence. Antioch does not just teach us to become expert psychologists, but promotes our professional development to become meaningful healers who work with intention, determination, and compassion.”

Learn more about AUSB’s PsyD program, which is chaired by Ron Pilato.