Curriculum

As with any doctoral program, coursework is only the beginning. In order to graduate, our students must complete 1000 hours of clinical practicum training, pass a Professional Competence Evaluation (PCE) and Comprehensive Examination, complete a clinical dissertation and a 1500-hour pre-doctoral internship.

The Year One curriculum (post bachelor’s entry) consists of 3 quarters of coursework (and a total of 150 hours of supervised experience) as follows:

Course Number, Description, and (Units)
WRK 601 Human Sexuality (0)

WRK 601 Human Sexuality (0)

In this workshop, students examine current topics including biological, psychological, psychosocial and cultural aspects of sexuality. Students explore their own sexual identities and their values regarding sexual behavior. In order to receive credit with the Board of Psychology or the Board of Behavioral Sciences for the Human Sexuality requirement for licensure, students must attend all ten hours of instruction.
WRK 602Child Abuse Reporting (0)

WRK 602 Child Abuse Reporting (0)

In this workshop, students learn how to assess for and report incidents of child abuse (sexual, physical, emotional or child neglect). The course considers indicators of abuse, crisis counseling techniques, community resources, the rights and responsibilities of reporting, the consequences of failure to report, how to care for a child’s needs after a report is made, sensitivity to previously abused children and adults and the implications and methods of treatment for children and adults. In order to receive credit with the Board of Psychology or the Board of Behavioral Sciences for the Child Abuse Assessment Training requirement for licensure, students must attend all seven hours of instruction.
WRK 603Introduction to Legal and Ethical Issues (0)

WRK 603 Introduction to Legal and Ethical Issues (0)

In this workshop, students learn how to assess for and report incidents of child abuse (sexual, physical, emotional or child neglect). The course considers indicators of abuse, crisis counseling techniques, community resources, the rights and responsibilities of reporting, the consequences of failure to report, how to care for a child’s needs after a report is made, sensitivity to previously abused children and adults and the implications and methods of treatment for children and adults. In order to receive credit with the Board of Psychology or the Board of Behavioral Sciences for the Child Abuse Assessment Training requirement for licensure, students must attend all seven hours of instruction.
PSC 601 Psychotherapy Theories (3)

PSC 601 Psychotherapy Theories (3)

In this course, students learn the concepts and techniques used in traditional theories of psychotherapy and examine the social, cultural and historical contexts that produced them. The emphasis is on a critical examination of the relevance of theory to practice with contemporary populations.
PSC 602Academic Writing (3)

PSC 602 Academic Writing (3)

The purpose of this course is to develop skills in academic writing, critical analysis and professional literature review. Students learn how to search psychology literature, write using APA style, and acquire other skills needed to produce graduate level papers.
PSC 603Research Methods (3)

PSC 603 Research Methods (3)

This course examines different approaches to the generation and evaluation of psychological theory and data. The strengths and weaknesses and ethical practice of quantitative and qualitative methods are examined with attention to the descriptive and inferential statistical methods used in hypothesis testing and psychological assessment.
PSC 606 Psychopathology (3)

PSC 606 Psychopathology (3)

This course provides a survey of the major theories, categories and treatment of psychopathology including psychopharmacological approaches. Students develop their diagnostic skills and a mastery of the categories and concepts of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM IV-TR).
PSC 607AFamily Systems (3)

PSC 607A Family Systems (3)

This course examines the major concepts of family systems theories and helps students conceptualize systemically. The history, premises, cultural influences and approaches of family therapy are explored. The application of systems theory with couples and families is also considered.
PSC 608A Psychological Measurement (3)

PSC 608A Psychological Measurement (3)

This course provides a broad and general examination of psychometric theory and its application to assessment instruments. Students will learn how tests are developed and how normative data is provided, including learning information about reliability and validity and the development of standard scores. In addition to understanding test construction, students will be introduced to the various test families and will learn how to select and critique assessment instruments.
PSC 609 Lifespan Development I: Child & Adolescent (3)

PSC 609 Lifespan Development I: Child & Adolescent (3)

This course examines the process of human growth and development throughout the life span. Development is examined from the perspectives of psychodynamic, cognitive, and social psychological theories with an emphasis on applying developmental concepts to clinical cases.
PSC 612 Social Justice & Cultural Competency I (3)

PSC 612 Social Justice & Cultural Competency I (3)

This experiential course fosters multicultural awareness, teaches students about the impact of multiple cultural influences and identities on clinical issues, and introduces students to culturally responsive assessment practices and clinical skills. Cultural influences and identities include: age, disability, religion/spirituality, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, indigenous heritage, national identity and gender.
PSC 613Group Processes & Therapy (3)

PSC 613 Group Processes & Therapy (3)

Students are introduced to the concepts and theories of group process, group membership and behavior. All students participate in the classroom group process under the leadership of the instructor, where opportunity is provided for learning group facilitation skills.
PSC 620D Professional Seminar IA: Psychotherapy Skills (3)

PSC 620D Professional Seminar IA: Psychotherapy Skills (3)

This course provides an introduction to basic psychotherapeutic concepts and skills, with particular attention to the nature of the relationship between psychotherapist and client. Students practice fundamental psychotherapy skills in the roles of therapist, client and observer. Students also learn to attend to process variables in psychotherapy, to differentiate between content and process, and to work with client affect, resistance and defense, transference and counter transference. Basic ethical and legal standards are explored.
PSC 620EProfessional Seminar IB: Foundations of Clinical Practice (3)

PSC 620E Professional Seminar IB: Foundations of Clinical Practice (3)

In this preparatory class for supervised experience, students view a live psychotherapy session conducted by the instructor during the first hour of class. The remaining class time is devoted to a discussion of the case and the interventions implemented by the therapist/instructor. Through their participation, students demonstrate their readiness to engage with clients in agency settings. Ethical and legal issues are reviewed.
PSC 622A Professional Seminar II: Case Conceptualization and Treatment Planning (3)

PSC 622A Professional Seminar II: Case Conceptualization and Treatment Planning (3)

In the class, students integrate the theoretical knowledge and clinical skills that they have been developing into case conceptualization and treatment planning skills. Learning objectives include formulating a theoretical conceptualization that also addresses developmental, multicultural and systemic factors. Students also learn to formulate short and long term therapy goals appropriate to the various phases of psychotherapy. Use of the clinical supervision and the development of a professional identity are also addressed.
PSC 652 Supervised Experience

PSC 652 Supervised Experience

Field experience takes students out of the classroom and brings them into the community to work with clients, professional psychotherapists and peers from other schools and disciplines. The experience allows students to develop psychological knowledge and psychotherapeutic skills by providing services in a variety of settings.

Course Number, Description, and (Units)
WRK 701 Psychopharmacology for Psychologists (0)

WRK 701 Psychopharmacology for Psychologists (0)

This supplementary course is a 6 hour workshop that will review principles of neurotransmission, and investigate the role of pharmaceuticals in the treatment of mental disorders. Topics to be discussed include: depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, insomnia, bi-polar disorder, attention-deficit disorder, and dementia. Current research and pharmacological treatment of these and other disorders will be discussed in lecture, case study and vignette format.
WRK 704 Advances in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (0)

WRK 704 Advances in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (0)

This supplementary course is a 6 hour workshop describing recent advances in the development of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and controversies surrounding its development and use.
PSC 701 The Roots of Modern Psychology (3)

PSC 701 The Roots of Modern Psychology (3)

This course examines the philosophical and historical origins of the discipline of psychology and of the perspectives which have shaped contemporary psychology. The course includes the various schools of thought associated with the field of psychology and the impact of these schools on contemporary practice in psychology. The emergence of family psychology as a synthesis of empiricism, systems thinking, and clinical psychotherapy is integrated.
PSC 702Individual and Family Development through the Lifespan (3)

PSC 702 Individual and Family Development through the Lifespan (3)

This course considers both individual theories of development throughout the lifespan and theories of the family life cycle and their interactions. Special attention is paid to issues of aging and long-term care.
PSC 703 Social Systems (3)

PSC 703 Social Systems (3)

This course focuses on the interrelationships between individuals and the social environment. Traditional approaches to understanding social behavior are examined within a systemic paradigm. Topics include attitude and attitude change, socialization, attribution theory, social influence theory, interpersonal attraction, small group interaction and prejudice and discrimination.
PSC 705Human Learning and Cognitive Processes(3)

PSC 705 Human Learning and Cognitive Processes (3)

This course examines theories of learning, memory, thought processes and decision-making. Historical and current approaches to understanding the individual, environmental, and social processes that determine knowledge and behavior change are reviewed.
PSC 706 Psychobiology (3)

PSC 706 Psychobiology (3)

This course provides a broad and general perspective of the biological and neuropsychological bases of human behavior. Central nervous system and organically-based dysfunctions and the implications for psychopharmacology are examined. The effects of trauma, head injury, and the neuropsychological aspects of psychological disorders are discussed in a systemic context. The role of medication in the treatment of psychological disorders is considered.
PSC 707A Research Methods in Clinical Psychology I (3)

PSC 707A Research Methods in Clinical Psychology I (3)

The course provides a rigorous examination of basic conceptual and methodological issues related to conducting research in clinical psychology. Quantitative approaches are emphasized. Introduction to SPSS is provided.
PSC 707B Advanced Research Methods in Clinical Psychology II (3)

PSC 707B Advanced Research Methods in Clinical Psychology II (3)

The course continues the broad and general approach to the study of research with more advanced conceptual and methodological issues related to conducting research in clinical psychology. Qualitative approaches are emphasized. Qualitative analytic strategies as well as the use of computer software for qualitative analysis are reviewed.
PSC 708 PSC 708 Data Analysis Strategies in Clinical Psychology (3)

PSC-708 Data Analysis Strategies in Clinical Psychology (3)

This course focuses on data analysis strategies used in quantitative research. Traditional statistical approaches to research both univariate and multivariate are considered.
PSC 709 PSC 709 Affective Bases of Behavior (3)

PSC-709 Affective Bases of Behavior (3)

This course explores the current knowledge in the area of affective aspects of behavior, including affect, mood, and emotion. The investigation into this content area incorporates the history of thought and development, its methods of inquiry and research, and the evolving nature of affect, mood, and emotion and their expression. Cognitive and affective neuroscience aspects will also be examined.
PSC 710A Family Systems II (3)

PSC 710A Family Systems II (3)

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of Family Psychology and the theoretical orientation of the Psy.D. curriculum. It includes an overview of systems concepts and their application to psychotherapy. The functioning of the individual and the family within the larger context (eco-systemic) is inherent in the course approach. Examination is made of other psychological theories from a systemic perspective.
PSC 711A Advanced Family Therapy (3)

PSC 711A Advanced Family Therapy (3)

The course reviews current theories and methods of family intervention. The application of family systems models includes transgenerational approaches, systems structural models, experiential approaches, family behavioral and cognitive-behavioral approaches, brief and postmodern approaches. Students analyze case material and develop interventions based on these approaches.
PSC 712 Couples Therapy (3)

PSC 712 Couples Therapy ( (3)

The literature on couples relationships and the application of couples’ interventions is reviewed. Students examine relationships of intimacy in order to understand the characteristics and processes in functional and dysfunctional relationships as well as the extrarelationship factors that influence them. Assessment, treatment planning and intervention skills from multiple theoretical perspectives will be covered through case studies, simulations and demonstrations.
PSC 713 Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy (3)

PSC 713 Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy (3)

This course covers the major intervention techniques for working with child and adolescent clients in the systemic context. Distinctions between normal and pathological behavior are drawn for the purposes of selecting appropriate treatment.
PSC 714 Family Violence (3)

PSC 714 Family Violence (3)

Violence in the family is considered from a number of theoretical and psychotherapeutic perspectives. Assessment and treatment issues related to child physical and sexual abuse, intimate partner abuse and elder abuse are the primary focus of the course with students learning through case material and simulations. Legal and ethical responsibilities are also reviewed.
PSC 715 Addictive Behaviors (2)

PSC 715 Addictive Behaviors (2)

The etiology and progression of addictive behaviors provide the core of this course. Assessment of and treatment models for addictive behaviors including substance abuse, eating disorders, sexual addictions and other high risk behaviors (e.g., gambling and spending addictions) are considered.
PSC 720 Cognitive Assessment (2)

PSC 720 Cognitive Assessment (2)

Taken in conjunction with PSC 720L, Cognitive Assessment Lab: This course covers the theory of test construction and psychometrics as the first course in a series on assessment. The use of cognitive tests such as the Wechsler Intelligence Scales with children and adults for purposes of assessing intelligence, development, learning and emotional disorders. Cultural issues in testing are considered.
PSC 720L Cognitive Assessment Lab (1)

PSC 720L Cognitive Assessment Lab (1)

Taken in conjunction with PSC 720, Cognitive Assessment: Students practice the administration of cognitive tests in a laboratory setting and prepare test reports.
PSC 721 Psychodiagnostic Assessment (2)

PSC 721 Psychodiagnostic Assessment (2)

Taken in conjunction with PSC 721L, Psychodiagnostic Assessment Lab: This course focuses on objectives measures of personality and psychopathology, such as the Millon, the MMPI and symptom inventories. Administration, scoring, interpretation and report writing are emphasized.
PSC 721L Psychodiagnostic Assessment Lab (1)

PSC 721L Psychodiagnostic Assessment Lab (1)

Taken in conjunction with PSY 721 Psychodiagnostic Assessment: Students practice the administration of objective personality tests and symptoms inventories and the production of test reports in a laboratory setting.
PSC 722 Projective Testing (2)

PSC 722 Projective Testing (2)

Taken in conjunction with PSC 722L, Projective Testing Lab: This course focuses on projective tests such as the Rorschach and the TAT. Administration, scoring and interpretation are emphasized.
PSC 722L Projective Testing Lab (1)

PSC 722L Projective Testing Lab (1)

Taken in conjunction with PSC 722, Projective Testing: Students practice the administration of projective personality tests and the production of test reports in a laboratory setting
PSC 723 Neuropsychological Assessment (2)

PSC 723 Neuropsychological Assessment (2)

Taken in conjunction with PSC 723L, Neuropsychological Assessment Lab: This course focuses on screening and assessing for neuropsychological impairment. Selection of appropriate neuropsychological tests is included. The use of tests covered in other assessment courses in the series is also considered for neuropsychological purposes.
PSC 723L Neuropsychological Assessment Lab (1)

PSC 723L Neuropsychological Assessment Lab (1)

Taken in conjunction with PSC 723, Neuropsychological Assessment: Students practice the administration of neuropsychological tests and the production of test reports in a laboratory setting.
PSC 730 Introduction to Family Forensic Psychology and Family Law (3)

PSC 730 Introduction to Family Forensic Psychology and Family Law (3)

The course considers the role of the psychologist in applying a family systems perspective to assessment and intervention with individuals and families who interact with the legal system. Family forensics involves such areas as child custody, family violence, alternative families, elder law, and family businesses. The course provides an overview of the field of family forensics, introduces students to the legal system and to the relevant laws impacting the area.
PSC 731 Assessing Families and Children in the Legal Context (3)

PSC 731 Assessing Families and Children in the Legal Context (3)

This course considers the specific assessment issues encountered in family forensic settings and introduces students to the special assessment tools available for children and families. Students are taught to present psychological data in a format meaningful to the court.
PSC 732 Expert Testimony (1)

PSC 732 Expert Testimony (1)

This course provides skills for psychologists to feel comfortable participating in the legal system as an expert witness (in contrast to providing testimony as a treating psychologist). Awareness of the various legal documents encountered (e.g. subpoenas, depositions, pleadings etc.) is also included.
PSC 733 Child Custody Evaluation (2)

PSC 733 Child Custody Evaluation (2)

Critical issues related to the well-being of children in the context of custody and visitation disputes are covered in this course. The course will consider how to do interviews of adults and children involved in such disputes, (including collateral parties), the type of psychological testing necessary and the need for home visits. Collaboration of the psychologist with other forensic team members is emphasized.
PSC 734 Mediation and Conflict Resolution (3)

PSC 734 Mediation and Conflict Resolution (3)

This course considers ethical, professional and legal issues in conducting mediation and using conflict resolution strategies. The application of unique family law issues to this area is examined. Also, students develop effective mediation and conflict resolution skills. Different models used in approaching mediation and conflict resolution and the different stages in these processes are included.
PSC 740 Integrating Science and Practice (3)

PSC 740 Integrating Science and Practice (3)

Today’s psychologist must be well versed in the science behind psychology as well as in practice-related issues. This course examines the interface between the scientific data base of psychology and its application to clinical work. In particular, we will consider empirically supported treatments and the need to defend clinical interventions from a scientific perspective. Outcome research and its application to practice will also be reviewed. Students will apply multicultural and other forms of critique to these data.
PSC 741 Clinical Issues in Multicultural Psychology (3)

PSC 741 Clinical Issues in Multicultural Psychology (3)

Continual demographic changes in client populations have made cultural competence an essential aspect of ethical psychotherapeutic practice. This course builds on students’ basic ability to work with multicultural clientele and focuses on the integration of culture into clinical assessment, intervention, treatment planning, and evaluation. Students learn to integrate culture into traditional approaches to treatment and are introduced to culturally-specific models and techniques.
PSC 742 Legal and Ethical Issues (3)

PSC 742 Legal and Ethical Issues (3)

This course reviews ethical guidelines and legal issues in professional psychology. Topics include confidentiality and privilege, family laws regarding divorce and child custody, relevant court decisions, involuntary hospitalization, suicide assessment, the APA Ethics Code and policies of the California Board of Psychology.
PSC 743 Teaching Psychology (2)

PSC 743 Teaching Psychology (2)

This course focuses on strategies for teaching psychology at the university level. Students will learn skills including preparing a course, delivering effective classroom presentation, designing student centered learning activities, fostering academic integrity, teaching with technology, and evaluation and documentation of learning.
PSC 744BProfessional Seminar IV: Advanced Clinical Skills (2)

PSC 744A Professional Seminar IV: Advanced Clinical Skills (2)

Electives are offered according to current student and faculty interest. Possible offerings include: focus on specific disorders (e.g., affective disorders, anxiety and stress disorders, eating disorders, personality disorders, etc.), on specific clinical problems (e.g., sexual dysfunction, impact of chronic illness on individual and family functioning, etc.), or on particular approaches to clinical intervention (e.g., consideration of certain theoretical orientations, such as postmodern approaches or techniques like psychodrama). Students enroll for a minimum of two of these electives.
PSC 750A Professional Seminar III: Case Conference (3)

PSC 750A Professional Seminar III: Case Conference (3)

The case conference is the first course in the clinical sequence. Students view a psychotherapy session during the first hour of class. The remaining class time is devoted to a discussion of the case and the interventions implemented by the therapist/instructor.
PSC 751 Practicum I (3)

PSC 751 Practicum I (3)

Students practice basic skills in assessment, interviewing, conducting mental status exams, and crisis management with culturally diverse clients in a clinical agency and receive consultation from the practicum instructor and student peers in class. The role of the psychologist is distinguished from other mental health professionals.
PSC 752 Practicum II (3)

PSC 752 Practicum II (3)

Students receive consultation from the practicum instructor and student peers while discussing legal, ethical and clinical issues which emerge in the course of their clinical field placement. Professional development is also addressed.
PSC 753 Practicum III (3)

PSC 753 Practicum III (3)

Students receive consultation from the practicum instructor and student peers while discussing legal, ethical and clinical issues which emerge in the course of their field placement. Professional development is also addressed and issues of gender receive special consideration.
PSC 754 Practicum IV Supervision and Consultation (3)

PSC 754 Practicum IV Supervision and Consultation (3)

Students receive consultation from the practicum instructor and student peers while discussing clinical issues based on their clinical field placement and related legal, ethical and professional issues. Models of supervision will be considered and students will discuss opportunities for consultation in outside agencies.
PSC 755 Practicum V Integrating Family Forensics (3)

PSC 755 Practicum V Integrating Family Forensics (3)

Students receive consultation from the practicum instructor and student peers while discussing clinical issues based on their clinical field placement and related legal, ethical and professional issues. Issues of Family Forensics will be the primary focus of this practicum and students will be encouraged to obtain clinical training at sites that provide experience with family forensic clients. Special issues related to ethics, practice and supervision in the family forensic field will be highlighted.
PSC 760 Clinical Dissertation Seminar I (3)

PSC 760 Clinical Dissertation Seminar I (3)

Students enroll for dissertation credit while they work with their advisor and committee on the Clinical Dissertation. Development of a research proposal must be accomplished in order to receive credit for this course.
PSC 761 Clinical Dissertation II (3)

PSC 761 Clinical Dissertation II (3)

Students enroll for dissertation credit while they work with their advisor and committee on the Clinical Dissertation. Data collection constitutes one of the specific tasks which must be accomplished in order to receive credit for this course.
PSC 763 Dissertation Continuation (0)

PSC 763 Dissertation Continuation (0)

Only students who have not completed the Clinical Dissertation prior to the internship should enroll in this course. Students enroll for dissertation continuation each quarter until the dissertation is complete. Students who are continuing to complete their dissertation after they proceed to or complete internship are required to enroll in this course each quarter until the dissertation is completed. Students will continue to meet with the dissertation chair and committee to facilitate completion of the dissertation.
PSC 790 Internship (1)

PSC 790 Internship (1)

A one year full time predoctoral internship is required prior to graduation. Students must complete this internship at a site approved by the Director of Clinical Training. Internship training sites are usually accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), are members or meet membership criteria of the Association of Psychology and Postdoctoral Internship Centers (APPIC) or the California Psychology Internship Council (CAPIC). The internship is an integral part of doctoral degree requirements and must be completed regardless of whether the student intends to obtain a license as a psychologist and independent of any previous clinical licenses obtained (e.g., MFT, LSCW, etc.). Prerequisites-Completion of all AUSB Psy.D. courses, completion of a minimum of 1000 hours of practicum at external sites and successful completion of a Professional Competence Evaluation, demonstrating students’ skill and knowledge in the field of psychology. Students must also be advanced to candidacy after successfully completing a Comprehensive Examination at the end of Year 3 of the program.

The Clinical Dissertation is intended to demonstrate that students have integrated the material they have learned during the doctoral program. Early in their program, students select an appropriate project. The Research Methods courses introduce students to conceptual and methodological material related to conducting qualitative and quantitative research. It is expected that students will complete the project prior to beginning their internship. We are interested in stimulating student creativity, therefore the options for completion of this project vary. The PsyD is an applied degree, thus the clinical dissertation will involve the investigation of a practical application, either through empirical (quantitative or qualitative), theoretical, or clinical evaluation strategies. Students will be guided in their work by their dissertation advisor, a second faculty member, and an outside expert.

It is expected that students will acquire a minimum of 1000 hours of clinical experience (practicum) prior to beginning the internship. Students should expect to be placed in a practicum site early in the program and will collect hours throughout the year.

Students are required to complete a full-time internship during the 5th year of the academic program. Internship training sites are usually accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), are members or meet membership criteria of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) or the California Psychology Internship Council (CAPIC). Incoming students will likely be placed in CAPIC or APPIC equivalent sites. The Director of Clinical Training will help students with the identification of appropriate internships.

Full-time students will enroll for 11- 13 units per quarter over 9-12 quarters (depending on whether enrollment is at the post-bachelor’s level or post-master’s advanced standing level) and a 1-unit year-long full time internship for a total of 108-144 quarter units. Coursework consists of foundational course work taken during the first two years in the program and clinical intervention and assessment courses, including courses in Family Forensic Psychology.

“During Practicum IV, students will identify and conceptualize a case which is then developed for presentation as part of the PCE. The PCE is intended to demonstrate students’ skill and knowledge in the field of psychology and to integrate their academic and clinical learning. The PCE must be completed prior to engaging in the application process for internship.”

Students take Comprehensive Examinations at the end of spring quarter of Year 3. This is a two-part exam, the first part is oral and the second part is written.  For the oral, or Professional Competency Exam (PCE), students identify and conceptualize a case, which is then developed for presentation. The PCE is intended to demonstrate students’ attitudes, knowledge and skill in the field of clinical psychology and to integrate their academic and clinical learning. The PCE must be passed prior to engaging in the internship application process. For the written part, the examination measures knowledge of multiple content areas in clinical psychology and is evaluated as pass/fail. A passing evaluation on all components of the exam is required for students to be eligible to apply for internship.

Full-time students will enroll for 11- 13 units per quarter over 9-12 quarters (depending on whether enrollment is at the post-bachelor’s level or post-master’s advanced standing level) and a 1-unit year-long full time internship for a total of 108-144 quarter units. Coursework consists of foundational course work taken during the first two years in the program, and clinical intervention and assessment courses, including courses.

In addition, students take 12 units of courses in Family Forensic Psychology, which includes training in child custody evaluation. Fifteen units of Professional coursework, 18 units of Practicum and Clinical Application courses, and 9 units of Clinical Dissertation complete the degree program.