MA with Multiple Subject & M/M Education Specialist Credential

It is possible for very focused students to earn the Multiple Subject and the Mild-to-Moderate Education Specialist credentials simultaneously through our MA in Education with Dual Credentials Program. A thesis project is included within the coursework to provide students with additional expertise on a topic of their choosing.

The two-year MA in Education with Dual Credentials Program is especially designed to prepare professional teachers to meet the needs of all kinds of learners inside the classroom. It also provides the skills and knowledge in leadership to become an active voice in education reform.

Students say that our program is rigorous, but they also say that Antioch’s emphasis on intellectual development, ecological literacy, diversity and how to create caring inclusive learning communities well prepares them for their real-world teaching careers! Our graduates are highly sought after for employment and become active participants in their schools and communities.

Learn more!

Program Highlights

  • Prepares candidates to teach the Common Core State Standards.
  • Candidates work as a team with their Multiple Subject cohort to support all learners in a continuum of services and programs, including the general education classroom.
  • Numerous opportunities to reflect on one’s strengths and challenges and to examine one’s own reasoning, values, and interpersonal skills
  • “Place based education” strategies and learn to teach respect for the ecological systems
  • Knowledge and skills necessary to work with second language learners’ English Language Development

Program Design

  • A full-time year (Quarters I-IV) during which candidates participate in a well-defined sequence of study designed to integrate the knowledge, skills and dispositions required to meet the CA Commission on Teacher Credential requirements for both credentials.
  • A second part-time year (Quarters VI-VIII) that focuses on education leadership and reform, and educational research.  Each of the research courses will focus on applying the material studied and the development of effective interpersonal group skills. Students will address contemporary problems, participate in active problem solving, and work collaboratively in groups.  The research course sequence prepares students to write the literature review, method section, data analysis and discussion of their research project.
  • Nine months of field experience!  One quarter of practicum in a general K-6 classroom, and two quarters of student-teaching in a K-12 special education setting.

Teacher Accreditation

Our Teacher Credentialing programs are approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC/CTC), 1900 Capital Ave., Sacramento, CA 95811-4213; phone (916) 445-7254. All credential programs offered by Antioch University Santa Barbara are CCTC Approved Professional Preparation Programs. To view a report of recent pass rate assessment for our programs and other California institutions see (Reports, Appendix B of State Report Card for Teacher Preparation Programs).

AUSB and AULA, campuses of a one-system university, offer mission consistent options that are accredited by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

The Multiple Subject Credential authorizes the holder to teach in self-contained classrooms such as classroom settings in most elementary schools. However, a teacher authorized for multiple subject instruction may be assigned to teach in any self-contained classroom (preschool, K-12, or in classes organized primarily for adults). In addition, the holder of a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential may serve in a core or team teaching setting.

The Education Specialist Instruction Credential: Mild/Moderate Disabilities authorizes the holder to conduct assessments, provide instruction, and special education related services to individuals in grades K-12 and up to the age of 22, with specific learning disabilities, mild/moderate mental retardation, other health impairment, emotional disturbance, and autism spectrum disorders within the disability area.

MA in Education with Dual Credentials Program – Year I

Multiple Subject and Preliminary Educational Specialist M/M Credentials
MA in Education with Dual Credentials Program - Year I
Quarter I (Summer) 20 Units
HDV 4550.SB Child Development and Learning (3)

HDV 4550.SB Child Development and Learning (3)

This advanced child development class integrates current child development theory and research with elementary and middle school teaching practice emphasizing the cognitive, social, moral, and emotional domains. Students learn to read and interpret professional journal articles in order to explore the influence of culture on child development and child rearing practices. Candidates review contrasting claims concerning what, how, and why children learn. They collect and interpret developmental data through formal observations of and interviews with children, making connections between the implications of developmental research on methods of teaching. Candidates also discuss other forms of interactions with children and their rights.

HDV 4581 Language Development & Acquisition (3)

HDV 4581 Language Development & Acquisition (3)

Credential candidates will develop knowledge of foundational theories, skills, and instructional practices necessary to make informed decisions regarding instruction, engagement and assessment that will ensure English language proficiency and academic progress for all students, especially English learners. Affective factors influencing students’ cognitive, social, and linguistic development will be addressed. Credential candidates will also be introduced to relevant federal and state laws, policies, and legal requirements governing the education and assessment of students who are designated as English language learners.

*HDV courses are considered prerequisites and may be taken prior to admittance to the program or satisfied through undergraduate coursework (upon evaluation and approval from AUSB Credentials Analyst).
TEP 5360.SB Foundations of Social Justice Education (4)

TEP 5360.SB Foundations of Social Justice Education (4)

This course provides an orientation to the philosophies of teaching and learning that guide the MEd/TC Program. A primary objective is to facilitate candidates’ beginning constructions of their professional identities as teachers in diverse classrooms. Candidates study foundations of philosophy, history, politics, pedagogy, sociology and purposes of public education in the US. Candidates review the demographics of student populations and how they are related to racism, classism, and other forms of bias and their opportunities. Candidates become familiar with the Common Core Standards in the context of Educational Reform. While developing their own philosophy of education, candidates learn how to establish a caring learning community based on the principles of equal inherent worth, and mutual respect. Candidates practice advocacy for democratic action.
TEP 5370.SBMediation and Conflict Resolution in Schools (3)

TEP 5370.SB Mediation and Conflict Resolution in Schools (3)

In this theory and experiential course, students learn and practice basic counseling and collaborative conflict resolution skills. Candidates learn strategies for communicating with individuals and groups, particularly with people who differ from themselves in terms of culture, ethnicity, language, gender, gender identity, sexual preference and social class. Candidates explore different ways of utilizing these skills and implementing these concepts in a multicultural school and classroom setting. Candidates develop sensitivity to students’ unique needs and issues. Candidates learn and practice developmentally appropriate skills for grades K through 8. Candidates will also reflect on their experience as a member of a cohort, and begin to use the concepts, skills and theories presented in the course to maximize the group’s productivity.
TESE 6011Individualized Education Design & Policy Implementation (1)

TESE 6011 Individualized Education Design & Policy Implementation (1)

This course builds upon the knowledge gained by candidates in TEP 6011. The focus of this course is to learn to implement special education law, specifically the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and its implications for school contexts. Candidates will learn how to prepare for and coordinate IEP meetings, including working closely with families, students, colleagues in regular and special education, and outside service providers. They understand the connections between assessment and instruction, and are able to design effective instructional plans to meet student needs. They learn to write appropriate short and long term goals and objectives and plan comprehensive programs to coordinate all aspects of a student’s educational program.
TESE 5361 Exploratory Practicum in Special Education (1)

TESE 5361 Exploratory Practicum in Special Education (1)

In this course candidates have planned observations and practicum experiences with the full range of the service delivery systems in special education. They interact with the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services for students with mild to moderate disabilities. Through interviews and observations, candidates explore the variety of services provided to individuals with disabilities in school and other community service settings, observing professionals in a variety of roles.
TEP 6011Social and Legal Dimensions of Special Education (2)

TEP 6011 Social and Legal Dimensions of Special Education (2)

This course supports the field aspects of TEP 5360.SB, foundations of Social Justice Education. Candidates work in schools to fulfill the fieldwork assignments within TEP 5360.SB and begin to use ethnographic methods to understand classroom cultures.
TEP 5051Reading Instruction in the Elem School Classroom (2)

TEP 5051 Reading Instruction in the Elem School Classroom (2)

In this course, candidates gain the knowledge and skills to provide balanced and comprehensive reading instruction for all students in self-contained, integrated and inclusive classrooms (K-8). Candidates learn to address the needs of emergent, beginning and fluent readers using developmentally appropriate strategies. Relationships between oral and written discourse and language variation are studied in order for candidates to begin to develop flexible literacy instruction strategies and skills to meet the needs of diverse students. Candidates reference social, cultural, economic and political factors affecting literacy development, for English learners as well as for students who are already fluent in the English language.
TEP 5361Foundations of Social Justice Education Lab (1)

TEP 5361 Foundations of Social Justice Education Lab (1)

This course supports the field aspects of TEP 5360.SB, foundations of Social Justice Education. Candidates work in schools to fulfill the fieldwork assignments within TEP 5360.SB and begin to use ethnographic methods to understand classroom cultures.
Quarter II (Fall) 23 Units
TEP 5070.SBReal World Mathematics (3)

TEP 5070.SB Real World Mathematics (3)

Real World Mathematics uses an interdisciplinary, culturally responsive approach to teaching mathematics that enables candidates to engage and teach the Common Core State Standards in a real world context to ALL students K-8. Candidates examine current research on teaching and learning mathematics and compare District-approved curriculum and National Common Core to develop a critical approach to teaching elementary school mathematics. This course provides opportunities for candidates to learn how children construct mathematical understanding, use basic arithmetic computation, concepts and symbols to solve common problems and apply them to novel problems. Candidates engage in critical dialogue to determine what teachers can do to create challenging and secure learning environments for their students to take intellectual risks and approach problems in meaningful ways. Special attention will be paid to issues of equity, and how the development of language, literacy and mathematical understanding can be integrated in the math classroom.
TEP 5330.SB Field Practicum (10)

TEP 5330.SB Field Practicum (10)

This field practicum is designed as a laboratory for TEP 505, 507 and 538. Candidates are placed in schools where they observe and participate using the theories and strategies taught in these courses. Candidates work with children from diverse cultural and language backgrounds. The practicum is designed to cover topics related to the development of reflective practice.
(Lab fee required for Education Field Practicum, student teaching)
TESE 5380.SB Comprehensive Behavior Assessment and Positive Behavior Support (3)

TESE 5380.SB Comprehensive Behavior Assessment and Positive Behavior Support (3)

Real World Mathematics uses an interdisciplinary, culturally responsive approach to teaching mathematics that enables candidates to engage and teach the Common Core State Standards in a real world context to ALL students K-8. Candidates examine current research on teaching and learning mathematics and compare District-approved curriculum and National Common Core to develop a critical approach to teaching elementary school mathematics. This course provides opportunities for candidates to learn how children construct mathematical understanding, use basic arithmetic computation, concepts and symbols to solve common problems and apply them to novel problems. Candidates engage in critical dialogue to determine what teachers can do to create challenging and secure learning environments for their students to take intellectual risks and approach problems in meaningful ways. Special attention will be paid to issues of equity, and how the development of language, literacy and mathematical understanding can be integrated in the math classroom.
TESE 5362Exploratory Practicum in Special Education (1)

TESE 5362 Exploratory Practicum in Special Education (1)

This course is a continuation of TESE 536A. In TESE 536B candidates have planned experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system and the providers of such services. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services for students with mild to moderate disabilities. Through interviews and observations, candidates explore the variety of services provided to individuals with disabilities in and out of the school setting.
TEP 5191 Educational Technology (3)

TEP 5191 Educational Technology (3) [description titl

The purpose of this course is to empower credential candidates, develop skills, and gain knowledge enabling them to use technology as a teaching and learning tool in today’s schools. Issues surrounding technology in the classroom will be discussed, including the Digital Divide, gender and equity issues, safe Internet use, social networking, and the effectiveness of technology as an educational tool. Strategies will be developed to integrate educational technology to support curricular standards. Special attention will be given to Universal Design as technology becomes a powerful way to address accessibility. Candidates will also learn cutting edge hardware and software use as it pertains to effectiveness in teaching and learning.
TEP 5052Reading Instruction in the Elem School Classroom (1)

TEP 5052 Reading Instruction in the Elem School Classroom (1)

In this course, candidates gain the knowledge and skills to provide balanced and comprehensive reading instruction for all students in self-contained, integrated and inclusive classrooms (K-8). Candidates learn to address the needs of emergent, beginning and fluent readers using developmentally appropriate strategies. Relationships between oral and written discourse and language variation are studied in order for candidates to begin to develop flexible literacy instruction strategies and skills to meet the needs of diverse students. Candidates reference social, cultural, economic and political factors affecting literacy development, for English learners as well as for students who are already fluent in the English language.
TESE 5410.SBIntro to Autism Spectrum Disorder (1)

TESE 5410.SB Intro to Autism Spectrum Disorder (1)

This 1-unit course provides an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The focus of this course is aligned with three new California ASD Standards: (1) Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD); (2) Teaching, Learning and Behavior Strategies for Students with ASD; and (3) Collaborating with Other Service Providers and Families. Course content is intended to complement and extend ASD competency development imbedded within the Special Education Mild/Moderate Credential Program. Course requirements will include completion of a core text on ASD; in-class group work on vignettes of various learners with ASD; and the critique, design and implementation of new, Scientifically-Based Practices (SBP’s) for educating students with ASD.
TESE 6012Social and Legal Dimensions of Special Education (1)

TEP 6012 Social and Legal Dimensions of Special Education (1)

This course supports the field aspects of TEP 5360.SB, foundations of Social Justice Education. Candidates work in schools to fulfill the fieldwork assignments within TEP 5360.SB and begin to use ethnographic methods to understand classroom cultures.
Quarter III (Winter) 21 Units
TESE 5121 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar I (12)

TESE 5121 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar I (12)

Candidates begin on-site daily student teaching under the supervision of a Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor. They begin to assume full responsibilities for the class. The required weekly seminar continues to integrate each week’s teaching experience with theory and methods studied in the Program. Culturally responsive and individualized instruction and teaching in both general and special education settings are reviewed and discussed in the context of candidates’ teaching experiences. Candidates continue to learn legal and professional requirements and expectations for the Individualized Education Programs of their students. Candidates’ questions are explored with peers and instructor in a supportive, problem-solving context.

TESE 5090.SB Assessment in Special Education (3)

TESE 5090.SB Assessment in Special Education (3)

The purpose of this course is to expose students to a variety of assessment methods appropriate for individuals with mild to moderate disabilities, including those who are culturally and linguistically diverse. This course will explore a range of assessment techniques, based on an ecological model of assessment which recognizes the impact of the assessment context on student performance. Emphasis will be on those instruments and assessment methods which provide direction for instruction as well as diagnosis, including, but not restricted to: traditional psychometric instruments, curriculum-based assessment, clinical observation, criterion-referenced assessment, and other alternative assessment techniques. Participants will engage in discussions about language practices and patterns of language use among cultural and linguistically diverse populations that may be misunderstood as language deficiencies. The dilemma of using traditional assessment instruments, such as standardized tests, is considered, and a variety of alternative assessment methods are explored.

TESE 5160.SB Understanding and Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities I (4)

TESE 5160.SB Understanding and Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities I (4)

This course focuses on meeting the needs of students with mild and moderate disabilities through effective teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, interventions, accommodations, and adaptations to core curriculum. Content areas include research based practices, observable phenomena and ways to manage them, ecological assessment and considerations, planning and organizing instruction and curriculum, and integrating technology. Emphasis is on adapting and implementing instructional techniques and materials, based on assessment, for learners with diverse needs and backgrounds to enhance development in areas of reading, literacy, mathematics, and meta-cognition.
TESE 5110Language Arts Curricula: Theory and Method (2)

TESE 5110 Language Arts Curricula: Theory and Method (2)

This course is designed to expand the credential candidates’ foundational learning from TEP 5051 and TEP 5052 Reading Instruction in Elementary School Classrooms, by providing them with opportunities for learning the knowledge and skills necessary to develop and enact a comprehensive, integrated, and methodologically grounded Language Arts Program that supports access to the core curriculum for all students and ensures that they are able to meet or exceed the California Language Arts Content Standards. Particular attention is given to the development of comprehensive literacy instruction for English learners. Candidates will learn theories and methods of instruction for English Language Development (ELD) and Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE). Integrated instructional approaches to promote language and literacy development through reading, writing, listening, and speaking will be addressed. This course is designed to help credential candidates begin to develop and enact the skills, understandings and dispositions necessary to make decisions regarding instruction and curriculum that will ensure English language proficiency and academic progress for each student.
Quarter IV (Spring) 23 Units
TEP 6021 Advocacy and Activity for Healthy Children (3)

TEP 6021 Advocacy and Activity for Healthy Children (3)

This course covers knowledge about cultural and socioeconomic differences relative to nutrition, physical and mental health, and healthcare service issues. Candidates learn skills in working with students and families from diverse backgrounds for the purposes of providing effective interventions concerning health problems. Drug awareness and sexuality education programs are examined and candidates develop their positions on these issues. Candidates learn skills in identifying and reporting physical and psychological neglect and abuse, substance abuse, and information regarding various referral options. Candidates learn fitness activities, developmentally appropriate movement activities as defined in the National Physical Education Standards and the California Framework on Physical Education, and develop knowledge of locomotor and non-locomotor skills. Definitions and examples of health related physical fitness are introduced and discussed.
TESE 5411.SB Intro to Autism Spectrum Disorder II (1)

TESE 5411.SB Intro to Autism Spectrum Disorder (1)

This 1-unit course provides an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The focus of this course is aligned with three new California ASD Standards: (1) Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD); (2) Teaching, Learning and Behavior Strategies for Students with ASD; and (3) Collaborating with Other Service Providers and Families. Course content is intended to complement and extend ASD competency development imbedded within the Special Education Mild/Moderate Credential Program. Course requirements will include completion of a core text on ASD; in-class group work on vignettes of various learners with ASD; and the critique, design and implementation of new, Scientifically-Based Practices (SBP’s) for educating students with ASD.
TESE 5151 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar II (12)

TESE 5151 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar II (12)

This course is part of ongoing professional development within the Antioch University Teacher Education and Master’s degree program. Candidates continue to engage in on-site daily student teaching in a setting with students with mild/moderate disabilities under the supervision of a Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor. The required weekly seminar continues to integrate each week’s teaching experience with theory and methods studied in the Program. Candidates take over all class responsibilities for at least a two-week period. A weekly small group seminar is used to discuss procedures that are implemented in the student teaching placements. Culturally responsive instruction and teaching with mutual respect and care are reviewed with peers and instructor in a supportive, problem-solving context.

TESE 5180.SB Family Dynamics and Communication for Special Education Services (3)

TESE 5180.SB Family Dynamics and Communication for Special Education Services (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with theory, general principles, and procedures for fostering collaborative partnerships among families, professionals, students, and other stakeholders that lead to outcomes of individual and mutual empowerment. In-class activities, discussions, course readings, and assignments will be used to facilitate understanding of research, recommended practices, and family perspectives concerning parent-professional partnerships. In addition, the interaction of culture and disability will be explored. A framework for addressing problems or conflicts that often arise between service providers and clients from different cultures will be discussed.
TESE 5170.SB Understanding and Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities II (4)

TESE 5170.SB Understanding and Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities II (4)

This course focuses on meeting the needs of students with mild and moderate disabilities through effective teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, interventions, accommodations, and adaptations to core curriculum. Content areas include research based practices, observable phenomena and ways to manage them, ecological assessment and considerations, planning and organizing instruction and curriculum, and integration of technology, including assistive technology. Emphasis is on adapting and implementing instructional techniques and materials, based on assessment, for learners with diverse needs and backgrounds to enhance development in areas of written expression, spelling, social studies, science, art, study skills, and transition related skills.

TEP 6350 and TEP 6310 can be taken during the Summer between Year I and Year II or during the quarters listed in Year II below.

MA in Education with Dual Credentials Program - Year II
Quarter V (Fall) 4 Units
TEP 6140 Foundations of Educational Research I (3)

TEP 6140 Foundations of Educational Research I (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the issues central to educational and social research. In order to provide the skills and knowledge that allow students to become critical consumers of both theory and research, the course includes discussion of various research designs, especially action research and ethnography, and key elements of critical evaluation. In addition, students learn to search and locate sources and support for current policies and practices related to their professional interests.

Foundations of Educational Research begins with students’ questions concerning the policies, issues and conditions of contemporary organizations. The knowledge, perspectives, and practice they need to become critical consumers of theory and research are provided. Students are presented with a systematic study of current research and research methods for conducting educational and organizational research. The objectives in this course focus on the knowledge base, research techniques, and applications of appropriate forms of research that can be applied to improve one’s own professional practice. Additionally, students will establish the research topic that will become the subject of their theses or projects.
TEP 6350Research Ethics Modules (1)* Can be taken in Summer or Fall Quarter during Year II prior to beginning research.

TEP 6350 Research Ethics Modules (1)

This course, which is completed online, provides students with the ethical and legal information they need in order to conduct research with human subjects. All students conducting research involving human participants must complete the ethics modules through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) Program and have a current research ethics certificate on file. These modules address the ethical considerations pertinent to research with human subjects in the behavioral and social sciences. These include Research with Protected Populations, Ethical Principles, Belmont Report, History and Ethical Principles, Avoiding Group Harms, Defining Research with Human Subjects, Assessing Risk, Informed Consent, Privacy and Confidentiality and Conflicts of Interest. Each student establishes contact with the CITI Program and completes the ethics modules by the end of the Winter Quarter, but before any data collection is undertaken. Instructions for accessing CITI modules and for overview of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) process are provided during the first and second sessions of TEP 614 in the Fall Quarter.
Quarter VI (Winter) 3 Units
TEP 6160
Critical Evaluation of Educational Research II (3)

TEP 6160 Critical Evaluation of Educational Research II (3)

In this course, students refine their ability to critically evaluate the reliability, validity, and implication of educational research. They become familiar with logical processes of problem conceptualization and hypothesis formulation. Qualitative and quantitative research methods are introduced. Both theoretical and practical issues of school-based research are examined. Students design their theses/projects, begin their literature reviews, and do a small pilot project.
Prerequisite(s): teaching credential or equivalent and TEP 614.
Quarter VII (Spring) 3 Units
TEP 6190 Producing & Disseminating Educational Research (3)

TEP 6190 Producing & Disseminating Educational Research (3)

In this course, students finalize their thesis designs and begin the data collection phase of their projects. They act as peer mentors to each other, providing both support and critique. Students complete the literature review for the projects and expand their skills in the use of descriptive and inferential statistics in data analysis. Students are instructed in professional writing skills and produce a short research article, proposal, or editorial. Students learn about professional development opportunities nationally and internationally, online, on campus, and on school sites. Students develop intellectual and professional networks that provide support for research and social change activities.
Prerequisite(s): TEP 614 and 616
Quarter VIII (Summer) 9 Units
TEP 6211 Thesis Study (6)

TEP 6211 Thesis Study (6)

Students review central features of their learning and receive support in the completion of their projects, which will incorporate these features. Students study and practice professional data interpretation, writing, organization, and presentation skills. They will critique each other’s written work. Methods of research publication are studied and candidates are encouraged to receive assistance toward publishing their work. Each student will be required to practice and present their conclusions to an appropriate community organization, professional group, or educational agency if they haven’t already participated in the public conversations in a previous quarter.
Prerequisite(s): TEP 614, 616 and 619 and approval of faculty advisor.
TEP 6310Resilience and the School Community (3)* Can be taken during Quarter VII (Spring)

TEP 6310 Resilience and the School Community (3)

This course will focus on supporting personal resilience and building community to enhance the development of positive health and academic behaviors. Resilience and community building strategies will be taught and practiced. Students will participate in personal reflection and curriculum development for the purpose of learning to strengthen their own and their students’ resilience.
TOTAL UNITS FOR MA + CREDENTIALS:
106

“My experience at Antioch was greatly enriched by my contact with warm and concerned staff and a strong cohort of study partners.”

– William Johnson, Alumni