MA with M/M Education Specialist Credential

A 12-month program designed for teachers who already possess a multiple subject or single subject credential that weaves the requirements for the Preliminary Education Specialist Instruction Credential: Mild-to-Moderate Disabilities with coursework leading toward a Master of Arts in Education. The collaborative, cohort-based model is the ideal setting in to learn essential skills related to student advocacy and working within diverse classrooms.

Candidates experience:

  • Two strands of course content: Research and Credential-specific.  Each of the research courses will focus on applying the material studied and the development of effective interpersonal group skills. Students will address contemporary problems, participate in active problem solving, and work collaboratively in groups. Candidates in the program complete a thesis. The research course sequence prepares students to write the literature review, method section, data analysis and discussion of their research project.  The second strand is a collection of courses that prepares candidates to provide instruction, assessment, and support to students with mild-to-moderate disabilities.  Courses in the credential-specific sequence include student-teaching accompanied by a professional seminar for two quarters.
  • Exploration topics of personal and professional interest and to examine their potential roles as leaders in a reflective community of learners
  • Opportunities to reflect on their own strengths and challenges and to examine their own reasoning, values, and interpersonal skills.
  • Two quarters (six months) of student-teaching in a K-12 special education setting
  • Knowledge and skills necessary to work with second language learners’ English Language Development

Candidates in the Education Specialist Mild/Moderate Program who are teachers with intern credentials may use their own classrooms to satisfy most of the fieldwork requirements. They are supervised by district appointed personnel in addition to Antioch University Santa Barbara Field Supervisors.

The Education Specialist Instruction Credential: Mild/Moderate Disabilities authorizes the holder to conduct assessments, provide instruction, and special education related services to individuals in grades K-12 and up to the age of 22, with specific learning disabilities, mild/moderate mental retardation, other health impairment, emotional disturbance, and autism spectrum disorders within the disability area.

AUSB and AULA, campuses of a one-system university, offer mission consistent options that are accredited by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

Learn more!

Master of Arts in Education (MA) with Mild-to-Moderate Ed. Specialist Credential Program Total Units 47
Quarter I (Fall) 15 Units
TESE 5361 Exploratory Practicum in Special Education (1)

TESE 5361 Exploratory Practicum in Special Education (1)

In this course candidates have planned observations and practicum experiences with the full range of the service delivery systems in special education. They interact with the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services for students with mild to moderate disabilities. Through interviews and observations, candidates explore the variety of services provided to individuals with disabilities in school and other community service settings, observing professionals in a variety of roles.

TESE 5380.SB Comprehensive Behavior Assessment and Positive Behavior Support (3)

TESE 5380.SB Comprehensive Behavior Assessment and Positive Behavior Support (3)

In this course, candidates study the research and practices of social and academic Positive Behavior Support with exceptional pupils in special education and inclusive settings. They learn theoretical and applied perspectives on behavior support; how to conduct comprehensive ecological and behavioral assessments, consistent with Positive Behavior Support; and how to derive multi-element Positive Behavior Support plans from such assessments. This course also covers ethical standards and professional conduct related to behavior support practices for individuals with disabilities. In addition, legal requirements, practices and procedures relating to Title 5, California Code of Regulations “Behavioral Interventions for Special Education Students,” and those pertaining to Federal law (IDEIA ‘04) will be infused throughout this course, and students will have a working knowledge of the requirements of State and Federal laws.

Classroom behavior support theory and practice, as well as the design and delivery of Positive Behavior Support (PBS) programs, will be presented in the context of a culturally and ethnically diverse society. In addition, actively soliciting, welcoming and valuing family expertise is considered integral to this course—for the Functional Behavioral Assessment and for the design and implementation of PBS.
TESE 5410.SBIntro to Autism Spectrum Disorder (1)

TESE 5410.SB Intro to Autism Spectrum Disorder (1)

This 1-unit course provides an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The focus of this course is aligned with three new California ASD Standards: (1) Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD); (2) Teaching, Learning and Behavior Strategies for Students with ASD; and (3) Collaborating with Other Service Providers and Families. Course content is intended to complement and extend ASD competency development imbedded within the Special Education Mild/Moderate Credential Program. Course requirements will include completion of a core text on ASD; in-class group work on vignettes of various learners with ASD; and the critique, design and implementation of new, Scientifically-Based Practices (SBP’s) for educating students with ASD.
TESE 6013 Individualized Education Design & Policy Implementation (2)

TESE 6013 Individualized Education Design & Policy Implementation (2)

This course builds upon the knowledge gained by candidates in TEP 601A. The focus of this course is to learn to implement special education law, specifically the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and its implications for school contexts. Candidates will learn how to prepare for and coordinate IEP meetings, including working closely with families, students, colleagues in regular and special education, and outside service providers. They understand the connections between assessment and instruction, and are able to design effective instructional plans to meet student needs. They learn to write appropriate short and long term goals and objectives and plan comprehensive programs to coordinate all aspects of a student’s educational program.
TESE 5192 Assistive Technology (1)

TESE 5192 Assistive Technology (1)

This course will explore the use of assistive technologies in schools, including their access, use and control in a democratic society; their use for development of problem solving, critical thinking, and creativity; and their integration into the school curriculum for students with mild to moderate disabilities.

Special educator course participants will specifically learn to use technology to facilitate the teaching and learning process for students with disabilities. They will learn about the terms, trends, history and current information based on applications of technology and assistive and adaptive devices for working with students in an educational setting. Emphasis will be placed on course participants learning the various low tech and high tech technology tools that are available to assist students with mild to moderate disabilities in an educational setting. Readings, lectures, and assignments will present definitions and instructionally relevant characteristics of students with mild to moderate disabilities. The course will also emphasize principles of effective methods for utilizing technology to effectively adapt instruction, curriculum, and assessments to meet the unique educational needs of students.
TESE 6140 Educational Research (3)

TESE 6140 Educational Research (3)

This 1-unit course provides an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The focus of this course is aligned with three new California ASD Standards: (1) Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD); (2) Teaching, Learning and Behavior Strategies for Students with ASD; and (3) Collaborating with Other Service Providers and Families. Course content is intended to complement and extend ASD competency development imbedded within the Special Education Mild/Moderate Credential Program. Course requirements will include completion of a core text on ASD; in-class group work on vignettes of various learners with ASD; and the critique, design and implementation of new, Scientifically-Based Practices (SBP’s) for educating students with ASD.
TESE 6300.SBSocial Justice Education (3)

TESE 6300.SB Social Justice Education (3)

Contemporary research and practice related to progressive education movements are studied, including humanistic, student-centered, democratic, environmental, character, radical pedagogy, moral education, de-schooling, and charter schools. Students explore their own assumptions about these approaches and write a supported essay on their approach to teaching and school reform. The concept and practices of activism within and outside of the system are introduced. During this course students also form a unique collegial support group for pursuing the master’s degree as experienced teachers. Antioch’s social justice mission and its impact in the educational program are shared in this course.
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Master of Arts in Education Program in Social Justice and Educational Leadership.
TESE 6350 Research Ethics for Human Subjects (1)

TESE 6350 Research Ethics for Human Subjects (1)

This course, which is completed online, provides students with the ethical and legal information they need in order to conduct research with human subjects. All students conducting research involving human participants must complete the ethics modules through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) Program and have a current research ethics certificate on file. These modules address the ethical considerations pertinent to research with human subjects in the behavioral and social sciences. These include Research with Protected Populations, Ethical Principles, Belmont Report, History and Ethical Principles, Avoiding Group Harms, Defining Research with Human Subjects, Assessing Risk, Informed Consent, Privacy and Confidentiality, and Conflicts of Interest. Each student establishes contact with the CITI Program and completes the ethics modules by the end of the Winter Quarter, but before any data collection is undertaken. Instructions for accessing CITI modules and for overview of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) process are provided during the first and second sessions of TEP 614 in the Fall Quarter.
TESE 505Reading Instruction in Elementary Classrooms (3)

TESE 5050 Reading Instruction in the Elementary School Classroom (3)

In this course, candidates gain the knowledge and skills to provide balanced and comprehensive reading instruction for all students in self-contained, integrated and inclusive classrooms (K-8). Candidates learn to address the needs of emergent, beginning and fluent readers using developmentally appropriate strategies. Relationships between oral and written discourse and language variation are studied in order for candidates to begin to develop flexible literacy instruction strategies and skills to meet the needs of diverse students. Candidates reference social, cultural, economic and political factors affecting literacy development, for English learners as well as for students who are already fluent in the English language.
*Candidates who have a single subject credential must take the course and pass the RICA.
Quarter II (Winter) 15 Units
TESE 5090.SBAssessment in Special Education (3)

TESE 5090.SB Assessment in Special Education (3)

The purpose of this course is to expose students to a variety of assessment methods appropriate for individuals with mild to moderate disabilities, including those who are culturally and linguistically diverse. This course will explore a range of assessment techniques, based on an ecological model of assessment which recognizes the impact of the assessment context on student performance. Emphasis will be on those instruments and assessment methods which provide direction for instruction as well as diagnosis, including, but not restricted to: traditional psychometric instruments, curriculum-based assessment, clinical observation, criterion-referenced assessment, and other alternative assessment techniques. Participants will engage in discussions about language practices and patterns of language use among cultural and linguistically diverse populations that may be misunderstood as language deficiencies. The dilemma of using traditional assessment instruments, such as standardized tests, is considered, and a variety of alternative assessment methods are explored.
TESE 5160.SB Understanding and Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities I (4)

TESE 5160.SB Understanding and Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities I (4)

This course focuses on meeting the needs of students with mild and moderate disabilities through effective teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, interventions, accommodations, and adaptations to core curriculum. Content areas include research based practices, observable phenomena and ways to manage them, ecological assessment and considerations, planning and organizing instruction and curriculum, and integrating technology. Emphasis is on adapting and implementing instructional techniques and materials, based on assessment, for learners with diverse needs and backgrounds to enhance development in areas of reading, literacy, mathematics, and meta-cognition.
TESE 5110Language Arts Curricula: Theory & Methods (2)

TESE 5110 Language Arts Curricula: Theory & Methods (2)

This course is designed to expand the credential candidates’ foundational learning from TEP 505 Reading Instruction in Elementary School Classrooms, by providing them with opportunities for learning the knowledge and skills necessary to develop and enact a comprehensive, integrated, and methodologically grounded Language Arts Program that supports access to the core curriculum for all students and ensures that they are able to meet or exceed the California Language Arts Content Standards. Particular attention is given to the development of comprehensive literacy instruction for English learners. Candidates will learn theories and methods of instruction for English Language Development (ELD) and Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE). Integrated instructional approaches to promote language and literacy development through reading, writing, listening, and speaking will be addressed. This course is designed to help credential candidates begin to develop and enact the skills, understandings and dispositions necessary to make decisions regarding instruction and curriculum that will ensure English language proficiency and academic progress for each student.
TESE 5122 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar I (3)

TESE 5122 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar I (3)

The purpose of this course is to expose students to a variety of assessment methods appropriate for individuals with mild to moderate disabilities, including those who are culturally and linguistically diverse. This course will explore a range of assessment techniques, based on an ecological model of assessment which recognizes the impact of the assessment context on student performance. Emphasis will be on those instruments and assessment methods which provide direction for instruction as well as diagnosis, including, but not restricted to: traditional psychometric instruments, curriculum-based assessment, clinical observation, criterion-referenced assessment, and other alternative assessment techniques. Participants will engage in discussions about language practices and patterns of language use among cultural and linguistically diverse populations that may be misunderstood as language deficiencies. The dilemma of using traditional assessment instruments, such as standardized tests, is considered, and a variety of alternative assessment methods are explored.
TESE 6160 Critical Evaluation of Educational Research (3)

TESE 6160Critical Evaluation of Educational Research (3)

In this course, students refine their ability to critically evaluate the reliability, validity, and implication of educational research. They become familiar with logical processes of problem conceptualization and hypothesis formulation. Qualitative and quantitative research methods are introduced. Both theoretical and practical issues of school-based research are examined. Students design their theses/projects, begin their literature reviews, and do a small pilot project.
Quarter III (Spring) 15 Units
TESE 5170.SB Understanding and Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities II (4)

TESE 5170.SB Understanding and Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities II (4)

This course focuses on meeting the needs of students with mild and moderate disabilities through effective teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, interventions, accommodations, and adaptations to core curriculum. Content areas include research based practices, observable phenomena and ways to manage them, ecological assessment and considerations, planning and organizing instruction and curriculum, and integration of technology, including assistive technology. Emphasis is on adapting and implementing instructional techniques and materials, based on assessment, for learners with diverse needs and backgrounds to enhance development in areas of written expression, spelling, social studies, science, art, study skills, and transition related skills.
TESE 5180.SB Family Dynamics and Communication for Special Education Services (3)

TESE 5180.SB Family Dynamics and Communication for Special Education Services (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with theory, general principles, and procedures for fostering collaborative partnerships among families, professionals, students, and other stakeholders that lead to outcomes of individual and mutual empowerment. In-class activities, discussions, course readings, and assignments will be used to facilitate understanding of research, recommended practices, and family perspectives concerning parent-professional partnerships. In addition, the interaction of culture and disability will be explored. A framework for addressing problems or conflicts that often arise between service providers and clients from different cultures will be discussed.
TESE 5411Autism Spectrum Disorder (1)

TESE 5411 Autism Spectrum Disorder (1)

This 1-unit course provides a series of culminating activities in reference to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). As the final course of two 1-unit courses in ASD, this course is intended to integrate ASD competency development with the applied skills acquired throughout the Special Education Mild/Moderate Credential Program. While both courses are aligned with the three California ASD Standards—“Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders; Teaching, Learning and Behavior Strategies for Students with ASD and Collaborating with Other Service Providers and Families”—the course content will emphasize the second Standard (i.e., “Teaching, Learning and Behavior Strategies”). Students will complete a core text on ASD and, in class teams, will respond to a series of vignettes of various learners with ASD. Specifically, they will design Scientifically Based Practices (SBPs) drawn from the combined literature of ASD, Learning Disabilities, Intellectual Disabilities, Emotional Disturbance and related Mild/Moderate Disabilities.
TESE 5362 Exploratory Practicum in Special Education (1)

TESE 5362 Exploratory Practicum in Special Education (1)

This course is a continuation of TESE 536A. In TESE 536B candidates have planned experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system and the providers of such services. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services for students with mild to moderate disabilities. Through interviews and observations, candidates explore the variety of services provided to individuals with disabilities in and out of the school setting.
TESE 5152 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar II (3)

TESE 5152 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar II (3)

(for candidates who already possess a basic teaching credential)
This course is part of ongoing professional development within the Antioch University Teacher Education and Master’s degree program. Candidates continue to engage in on-site daily student teaching in a setting with students with mild/moderate disabilities under the supervision of a Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor. The required weekly seminar continues to integrate each week’s teaching experience with theory and methods studied in the Program. Candidates take over all class responsibilities for at least a two-week period. A weekly small group seminar is used to discuss procedures that are implemented in the student teaching placements. Culturally responsive instruction and teaching with mutual respect and care are reviewed with peers and instructor in a supportive, problem-solving context.
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Student Teaching in previous quarter (TESE 512A) or at the discretion of the Chair.
TESE 6190 Producing & Disseminating Educational Research (3)

TESE 6190 Producing & Disseminating Educational Research (3)

In this course, students finalize their thesis designs and begin the data collection phase of their projects. They act as peer mentors to each other, providing both support and critique. Students complete the literature review for the projects and expand their skills in the use of descriptive and inferential statistics in data analysis. Students are instructed in professional writing skills and produce a short research article, proposal, or editorial. Students learn about professional development opportunities nationally and internationally, online, on campus, and on school sites. Students develop intellectual and professional networks that provide support for research and social change activities.
Quarter IV (Summer) 6 Units
TESE 6211Thesis Study (6)

TESE 6211 Thesis Study (6)

Students review central features of their learning and receive support in the completion of their projects, which will incorporate these features. Students study and practice professional data interpretation, writing, organization, and presentation skills. They will critique each other’s written work. Methods of research publication are studied and candidates are encouraged to receive assistance toward publishing their work. Each student will be required to practice and present their conclusions to an appropriate community organization, professional group, or educational agency if they haven’t already participated in the public conversations in a previous quarter.
Total Units 51

“The educational staff at Antioch does a phenomenal job at pushing you but always placing you in a position to succeed.”

– Chris Wichowski, Master’s in Education with Mild to Moderate Special Education credential